First Glaze Firing

Griselda’s first glaze firing was yesterday! I unloaded her this morning. She can only hold about half the stuff even the wee Rocket kiln at the clay studio can, so that’s going to bring my firings a lot closer together, but she cools down MUCH faster. Time from cracking the lid to taking out the bottom pieces was all of three minutes, and I sure as heck didn’t break a sweat.

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Also, all the cups for Hot Mud came out. Above, that’s “Crewelwork Embroidery”, “Perdido Street Station”, and “Crafted”. I’m delighted with some of the batch, satisfied with others, and frankly disappointed with Backyard Gardening. Oh well. Most of them worked.

Bisqued tiles!

I’ve been busy as a very busy thing, getting ready for the big Christmas Craft Fair at the Arts and Culture Centre this week. My last glaze kiln is loaded to the brim with Robots and tiles, ready to be fired tomorrow. Can’t wait to see them all finished.

Also, can’t wait to have a sort-f day off. The kiln firing is going to take something like twelve hours, and I only need to be around for parts of it. I’ve got the day off work, and won’t be making new things (because I’ll have no time the next day to trim them), so… I have most of a day to relax.

I plan to a) figure out my craft fair knitting for this year, and b) read.[1]

[1] The ever-effervescent and potter extraordinaire Jay Kimball is in town. He was the clay studio coordinator when I first started, and moved away to Saskatchewan back when my throwing involved a lot more swear words. It’s been very rewarding to show him my gallery show, and the Robots, and the tiles, and to get positive feedback on them.

Anyway, this is a rambly footnote to say jay had a garage sale party last night to clear out some stuff left behind by his most recent set of tenants, and in amongst the action figures and the catgirl costumes, there were some great books.[2]

[2] Two about medieval witches, one about sex and minority groups in the Middle Ages, and one about Hindu goddesses that I picked up more for the “One of These Things is Not Like The Other Ones” than from any previous interest in the subject.